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The 2020 NYC 40 Under 40 Rising Stars


10 11 20

 

 

Domna Antoniadis attended Fordham Law School with the aim of combining her interest in law and health care, which she did in part by co-founding the school’s health law club. She interned with the LegalHealth division of the New York Legal Assistance Group and later completed a post-graduate fellowship at the organization before being hired as a staff attorney.

During her eight years at the organization, Antoniadis has worked with a wide range of the organization’s clients while running free legal clinics at Mount Sinai Morningside, Woodhull Hospital Geriatric Care Center and Bellevue Cancer Center. Antoniadis also created a legal navigator program, allowing for graduate social work students to meet their clinical requirements at a legal services organization.

Currently, Antoniadis has been working on the organization’s Avon Breast Cancer Project and running Bellevue Cancer Center’s free legal clinic, where she collaborates with doctors and provides assistance to undocumented immigrants.

Antoniadis testified to the New York City Council about a proposal that would expand health insurance in New York to undocumented immigrants, saying that over the past five years she personally worked with more than 200 people who would otherwise not have been able to access lifesaving medical treatment because of their immigration status.

“The ability to do the direct services and then actually gather the information to present to those who are making policy, I think, is definitely something that I feel really proud of,” she says.

Mufazzal Hossain

Democratic District Leader, Assembly District 38

After Mufazzal Hossain won his district leader seat in July, he told himself he would take a one-week break. For months he had been campaigning and working to make sure coronavirus relief aid was reaching Muslim and South Asian families in Queens, on top of working a full-time job. But he quickly found himself right back in it, working with the nonprofit ICNA Relief to distribute food at his local mosque and handing out personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer in his community.

Hossain was born into a political family in Bangladesh, but he says his call to politics came with the election of President Donald Trump. After 9/11, Hossain’s family returned to Bangladesh from Queens, fearing a growing tide of Islamophobia in the United States. He came back to New York after being educated in civil engineering in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and he was determined to stand his ground now that the United States seemed to be moving in a xenophobic direction once again. “(If) I ever have kids, I don’t want them to be born into a situation … where they have to flee,” he says.

Hossain maintains his career as an estimator for a construction firm, but he says he enjoys using his analytical skills in politics. He is the vice president of diversity and outreach for the Queens County Young Democrats. “(Politics) gives me an opportunity to research about everything that’s changing at a rapid pace,” he says. “And that’s with the purpose of helping people out.”

After Mufazzal Hossain won his district leader seat in July, he told himself he would take a one-week break. For months he had been campaigning and working to make sure coronavirus relief aid was reaching Muslim and South Asian families in Queens, on top of working a full-time job. But he quickly found himself right back in it, working with the nonprofit ICNA Relief to distribute food at his local mosque and handing out personal protective equipment and hand sanitizer in his community.

Hossain was born into a political family in Bangladesh, but he says his call to politics came with the election of President Donald Trump. After 9/11, Hossain’s family returned to Bangladesh from Queens, fearing a growing tide of Islamophobia in the United States. He came back to New York after being educated in civil engineering in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and he was determined to stand his ground now that the United States seemed to be moving in a xenophobic direction once again. “(If) I ever have kids, I don’t want them to be born into a situation … where they have to flee,” he says.

Hossain maintains his career as an estimator for a construction firm, but he says he enjoys using his analytical skills in politics. He is the vice president of diversity and outreach for the Queens County Young Democrats. “(Politics) gives me an opportunity to research about everything that’s changing at a rapid pace,” he says. “And that’s with the purpose of helping people out.”

To read more and see the rest of the 40 under 40 Rising Starts Follow the link below!

Article Courtesy: cityandstateny.com