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Ramadan Clash with 9/11 Anniversary Raises Fears

Ramadan Clash with 9/11 Anniversary Raises Fears

Aug 18, 2010

 

Celebrations to mark end of Muslim fasting could be deliberately misinterpreted to spark hostility, religious groups warn

 

By Riazat Butt and Chris McGreal, Guardian

 

August 17, 2010 – Islamic groups in the US fear an overlap between the end of Ramadan and the anniversary of 9/11 will lead to criticisms that Muslims are celebrating the 2001 terrorist attacks.

 


Islam follows a lunar calendar, so Ramadan begins approximately 10 days earlier every year. This year, Eid al-Fitr – the festival that marks the end of fasting – falls on or around September 11.

 

Some groups worry that the coincidence will increase suspicion and hostility towards Islam at a time when feelings towards their religion are already running high.

 

President Barack Obama has come under intense criticism for throwing his weight behind plans to build an Islamic community centre close to Ground Zero. Newt Gingrich, the former speaker of the House of Representatives, compared the planned mosque to “Nazis” erecting a sign next to the Washington Holocaust museum.

 

Americans Against Hate have accused organisers of one Ramadan event of “spitting in the face of Americans” because they had scheduled activities for September 12.

 

The Islamic Circle of North America decided against holding its Muslim family day on September 11 out of respect for victims and families. Founder Tariq Amanullah worked in the World Trade Centre and died in the attacks.

 

An ICNA spokesman, Naeem Baig, said: “We took the decision not to have it on September 11 because it is not a day to celebrate. We will be mourning the deaths of all those who perished.

 

“We wish it to be as close to Eid as possible. But we don’t want it on 9/11. That would be insensitive, we had to think of that.”

 

He said that some critics would deliberately misinterpret Eid celebrations as something sinister but that the misconception was mostly due to ignorance of Islamic festivals.

 

The Muslim Public Affairs Council, an advocacy group based in Los Angeles, is reported to have contacted police to alert them to the overlapping dates. Another has urged mosques to improve surveillance and security on their premises.

 

Ibrahim Hooper, of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said it was up to each individual community how they celebrated Eid but they might change the nature of the public events because of its proximity to 9/11.

 

“I don’t think people will change their religious observance. Eid is a prayer in the morning but they might do something about the funfairs and bazaars they hold to celebrate.

 

“We always tell mosques to revise their security when Islamophobia is on the rise. We have a whole industry of people searching for any excuse to bash Islam and this is one of them.”

 

Haroon Moghul, the director of an Islamic outreach body, wrote: “If Eid falls on the anniversary of that day, it will be an especially difficult task for a Muslim in New York. Many of our congregations were hurt that day, either personally or through the loss of loved ones. Many good friends of mine rushed to ground zero to give aid and spent hours, even days, doing what they could for the victims and for the brave first responders who were badly wounded.”

 

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Article Courtesy: Guardian News and Media Limited
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/aug/17/ramadan-clash-9-11-anniversary

40 Comments

  1. Nur

    These people have a lot of nerve! Its our Islamic Holiday. were not gonna stop it for anybody. and what about all the muslims that died in 9/11? Muslims died there too tell them to swallow that!

    Reply
  2. Zou

    I agree that certain measures should be taken to make sure the sad day of 9/11 will be respected. I don’t like provocations. if I’m told there are angry anti-islamic guys planning to manifest in front of my mosque, I would stay home and pray.

    Reply
  3. Nsenga

    This 9/11 masquerading stuff is getting totally out of hand. I’m a New Yorker born and raised and the Eid festivities are not like parades in the street. They are actually very modest in NY. If you are guilty of the attacks please apologize, if not, then mourn and be a victim who is trying to move on like me and everybody else who suffered that day. People seem to be forgetting that New York is a cosmopolitan city. Its a shame that people who don’t understand our nature and resilience are in the midst of the conversation about what happens in our city. Ramadan is not clashing with anything. Islam is not clashing. Stop acting as if Islam is a problem! Get on your own program and stop feeding into this opportunist political pimping conversation. I’m tired of this sort of fear-mongering talk. I also find it quite annoying!

    Reply
  4. Asif

    Nur: I completely agree with you.
    We Muslims need to develop a back-bone. The amount of compromise that our ‘so-called’ leaders are doing is getting to be ridiculous.
    And these leaders blame the Middle East rulers for being spineless
    We will celebrate Eid on whichever it date it is

    Reply
  5. Yacine

    I would ten ask Zoo what if they manifested in front of your own home? Would you then leave this country? Celebrating your holiday at your mosque is not provocation, it is rather your absolute right guaranteed by our nation’s religious freedom and diversity.

    Reply
  6. FHD

    There is absolutely no need of being feerful of a hand full of cowards. I mean come on… now Muslims have become so weak that they cannot even celebrate their Holy Occasions because of something happened on that day in this country ? ICNA should take a bold action and go ahead with the program. This is sending such a weak and negative message to the community.

    Reply
  7. Aisha

    Salaam Alaikum – I decided that I am personally going to give all white people who look like Timothy McVay mean, dirty looks on April 15th when the Oklahoma City tragedy took place because I have family that worked for the Government – although they were all retired by 1995 and were not in the Federal Bldg that day.. oh.. and also, since I am white – should I give myself a mean look too… this is how ludicrous this whole thing is. I do agree that it is always good to be politically correct in the country you live in – but, come on, when are people going to stop bringing this up every single year. May Allah Azza Wajaal give us Sabr..

    Reply
  8. Heather

    Asalaamu Alaikum…This is ridiculous. Live and let live. The people responsible for these attacks were crazies, just like every religion has crazies on the fringe. People need to realize that Muslims are just like everybody else…good people trying to live their lives. Condemn the people who were responsible for the attacks, but don’t connect them to Islam. They were crazy people. I am a convert to Islam. If I had thought Islam was a religion full of terrorists and angry people, I would not have joined.
    Ridiculous.

    Reply
  9. Noor

    This is actually is quite simple. And could do immense benefit to Muslims in US if we think this one through and plan ahead. If Eid falls on Sep 11th, we should use that as an opportunity to remember those who dies, pray for them. Sep 11th is a Sat. Invite our neighbors, dignitaries, local officials to the prayer service in rememberance of those who lost their lives on Sep 11th. Muslim and non-muslims. Condemn terrorism. Lets the media cover this. It can truly be a day to remember. I think Allah (SWT) is presenting us with a unique opportunity to reach out and build bridges.

    Reply
  10. Asif

    And just to add one more thought of the day:
    As much as I am opposed to Cordoba Group (I believe they are too liberal and certain Sufis are fools), I do feel they should not back down of this Center they want to build.
    If NY doesn’t allow it, they must use present laws to allow this center to be built.
    We cannot back down on every thing. Our bretheren are occupied, bombed…Damn it, where we pay taxes we should not be allowed to cower just because it goes against their sensibilities.
    I cannot tell you how much pleasure it gives me to see them get rankled over Megrahi.. though the angst we feel still pales in comparision

    Reply
  11. Asif

    Noor: you really need to re-examine your basics of Islam.
    It is very clear in Islam –
    one cannot pray/make dua for a dead non-Muslim. Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) wanted to pray for his parents but he was not allowed to by Angel Jibreel (on Allah’s command)
    So before we all go touchy-touchy with our neighbors, lets not forget that our first duty is to follow Islam.

    Reply
  12. Muslim

    Nur: I agree, it’s our holiday and we need to celebrate as loudly and proudly as we can.
    Noor: i disagree, stop acting like apologetic Muslims. Why the hell should pray for these people and be all sad and what not on our celebration day! How much do you or they pray on xmas for the over million Iraqis and afghans they have massacred in their homicidal oil greedy holocaust crusade???
    The whipped Muslims of ICNA/ISNA and other so called Muslim leaders need to stop fearing their kuffar masters they aim to please and start fearing Allah. They need to stop having iftar dinner parties at the white house while they are bombing our Muslim brothers and sisters even in Ramadan. No amount of back kissing is going to save you when they decide to come for you. Does Allah not say, they will not leave you alone till you abandon your faith all together?

    Reply
    • Asi

      aslam all, well i get the argument for both sides and allah says that the kafir will never be pleased with us until we become like them. However, the problem with this ummah is that we have failed when it comes to changing and shaping perspective towards muslim and this is one way we can do it. Those that have lost families will not c it as a day of eid but a day of muslims rejoicing the history. When we say that we are just as devasted by the attacks, then we do need to show it and back it up and not be so flamboyant about our day. Eid is eid whether we celebrate on the smale scale or more grandly. Therefore, I agree with br. Asif.
      may allah protect us all…ameen

      Reply
  13. Samyabad

    I respect the right to pray , and have one faith or another. But I firmly believe that the religions has by enlarge done bad , rather than good to humanity. Religions are the ghosts of the past that put the chain on free thought. They never liberate, but make slave of their line of thought. So they are useless intellectual tools for modern man. I am utterly surpised why people waste valuable time in this useless enterprise of religion. Big Shame.

    Reply
  14. Sammers

    I will celebrate eid and pray for the thousands of families of civilians that died in New York on 9-11. I will also pray for the iraqi civilians and american that have died in Iraq, and thier families in the past 8 years.
    After which I will celebrate life as it was meant to be. Not in fear, hatred or revenge. But with my family and the community that is america.

    Reply
  15. Imran

    Salamalaykum brothers and sisters, let us all just step back a minute and c what we r saying to each other, we r arguing and this isn’t right, in the month of ramadhan. I don’t know what I say now would matter or not but let’s all just pray to the Allmighty for peace and sabr , Jazak Allah wa khair

    Reply
  16. Sof

    Oh for Pete’s sake….. SERIOUSLY!!!!!
    I agree with the majority who posted saying that we should GO ON with our lives and celebrate EID. Muslims too died on 9/11.
    And as “MUSLIM” posted, no non Muslim is going to pray for Muslims on Xmas.
    Seriously!!! Let’s go back to our deen and fear Allah ALONE!!! We need to have our back’s straightened and stand alone.

    Reply
  17. Husain

    ICNA is filled with a bunch of fools who don’t realize what they are doing. By compromising on this issue, they have in effect told the world that if there is enough pressure on them, they will forfeit their rights. What’s next? When people start becoming offended that we pray at all, maybe ICNA should declare that “prayer on a daily basis does not accord with current sensitivities, and therefore we ask all Muslims to refrain from it and be good Americans.” Pathetic!

    Reply
  18. Mohammad

    Dear Brothers & Sisters:
    So we are giving message to our children that make sure our Islamic celebration days clash with other world’s incidents then change it. Come on what kind of muslims we are. Eid is a great religious day, celebrate it with islamic way but don’t do Biddats.

    Reply
  19. Muslimah Abdul Kareem

    The moon was not sited in North America, Allahs decree. If the moon hilala is sighted in sha Allah we break on Friday the 10th. If it is not sighted then wer have to fast on the 10th leaving the 11th as our Eid. A gift fom Allah and A day to celebrate. Give Dawah on that day. Or supplicate to Allah for a sighting. Dua changes the decree. But if it does not happen then Allah will test your faith that day. Fear non but Allah and obey your Lord. Which of the favors of your Lord will you deny. Ameen.

    Reply
  20. Muslimah Abdul Kareem

    Also, if it arises fitnah with people then I would not travel on that day. Besides, what is wrong with Muslim day on Sunday. Minus a Eid prayer. It is still the weekend and Allah’s mercy most people are already off from work. May Allah help us and make it easy for us. Our safety is important but our Lord comes first. What a test.

    Reply
  21. Muslimah Abdul Kareem

    Also, to the comment of ICNA is filled with a bunch of fools……not. I am part of ICNA. Each one of us have our own opinion on things. We all have to stand before Allah. We meet and discuss our ideas and come together on one acord. If you are a true believer and follow the whole Qur’an you would know that Allah says not to call names. That is disobedience on your part toward Allah. Also, the Prophet peace be upon him said he who is harsh to Allah’s creation Allah will be harsh to them. Anyone with that attitude towards your Muslim brother or sister and you bow to Allah in Islam should be ashamed. We are fasting. This is a month to purify yourself. If your ideas are from the Haqq then join ICNA let’s hear your voice. Make a difference. We are not here to hurt others we are here to help and work in the cause of Allah. You can pray for non Muslims but you can not pray for a hypocrite. We ask Allah to guide our non Muslim family members to the straight path. On that note Ramadhan Kareem!

    Reply
  22. Asif

    Muslimah: As quoted from the article
    Naeem Baig, said: “We took the decision not to have it on September 11 because it is not a day to celebrate.
    Is ICNA/Naeem not saying that even if Eid is on 9/11 then no Eid !! What a travesty. If Eid falls on that day, then indeed it is a day to rejoice end of Ramadan and start of Eid.
    Not everyone can be in leadership – some don’t have time, some don’t have personality, some don’t have desire.
    Thats why blog in the hope that an ICNA member can read ‘some’ opinions and communicate them also to the leadership.
    As for praying for a non-Muslim: clearly if a non-Muslim is alive, then by all means we can. But if a non-Muslim is dead, then we cannot. This is clear

    Reply
  23. jennifer bashir

    has ICNA DONE ANYTHING ABOUT THE GUY WHO runs the chruch in florida and want to burn the quran on 911.
    we should celebrate the day eid is , only satan fast that day

    Reply
  24. Basheer

    Asif,
    Read it properly..
    The Islamic Circle of North America decided against holding its Muslim family day on September 11 out of respect for victims and families. Founder Tariq Amanullah worked in the World Trade Centre and died in the attacks.
    An ICNA spokesman, Naeem Baig, said: “We took the decision not to have it on September 11 because it is not a day to celebrate. We will be mourning the deaths of all those who perished.
    “We wish it to be as close to Eid as possible. But we don’t want it on 9/11. That would be insensitive, we had to think of that.”
    He is talking about Muslim Family Day conducted by ICNA, not about Eid.
    Please don’t quote out of context like some missionaries do from Qur’an.

    Reply
  25. imaan

    Muslims should respect people of all faiths, but they shouldn’t apologize for being Muslim. There’s a great anti-Islam media at work in the US promoting Islamaphobia to create fears in public out of nothing. If anything, Muslims should be apologized to for all the massive unjust killing of our brothers and sisters across the globe at the hands of this govt on this false wars when we all clearly know it’s for stealing and taking control of natural resources. I’m tired of our US Islamic organizations keeping a quiet mouth when it comes to speaking up about the injustice happening around the world at the hands of our so called govt here. We as American citizens have every right to stand for justice and truth and it’s time we speak the truth instead of remaining apologetic. I’m sure if 9/11 were to fall on Christmas Day, all the Christians wouldn’t stop celebrating Christmas in fear that they’re celebrating the killing of their fellow citizens. At least Islamic Eid is divine , not a hallmark, man made holiday. I’m tired of organizations like ISNA and many others always sending apologetic messages without the messages of grievances of our brothers and sisters continuing to suffer in these unjust wars across the Muslim countries. If you don’t want to create terrorists, maybe we should fight for truth and justice here first and start electing non-Zionist officials and stop fearing people instead of Allah SWT. And another thing as a Muslim you can do to help: it’s time to build our media and grow it so our voices get heard too instead of the Islamaphobes. We need to stop letting our tax dollars being used against our brothers and sisters. Claim as much as you can on your W-2, W-4 for not handing over your taxes right away. It’s better to owe at the end than get return. When you owe at the end of the year, give to Islamic charities causes which are tax deductible and help build our communities stronger that stand up for truth and haqq for all people instd supporting the terrorist state of Israel or helping build more WMDs to be used against our own Muslims brothers and sisters across the globe! It’s time we use our money for better causes as other organizations are using it against us our own money. It’s time for Muslims to take responsibility and Muslims in America have a lot to do and lot to answer to Allah for the suffering of Muslims across the globe at the hands of our govt and Islamaphobe media. I appreciate all the work ICNA and Gainpeace are doing for Dawah and producing better work than ISNA which has just become apologetic and not much standing for Muslim rights. I will appreciate them more when they actually start sending message to the govt to stop killing fellow Muslims everywhere instead of always telling Muslims to stop being Muslim. Justice is a two way street. You can’t ask Muslims to sit quietly and keep apologizing while our fellow brothers and sisters are suffering unjustly!

    Reply
  26. Husain

    Basheer, you obviously don’t understand what Asif is saying–why don’t you read what he is saying? Naeem Baig’s statement was general: that September 11 is not a day to celebrate. So what if Eid falls on that day? Should we not celebrate it then, if it falls on September 11, because it is not a day to celebrate?
    As for Muslimah Abdul Kareem’s statement that calling ICNA a bunch of fools is “name calling,” then that is the exact wording that Allah uses in the Quran:
    وَإِذَا قِيلَ لَهُمْ آمِنُوا كَمَا آمَنَ النَّاسُ قَالُوا أَنُؤْمِنُ كَمَا آمَنَ السُّفَهَاءُ أَلَا إِنَّهُمْ هُمُ السُّفَهَاءُ وَلَكِنْ لَا يَعْلَمُونَ
    “And when it is said to them: believe, they say we do not believe in what the fools believe, but they are the stupid fools who do not know.” 2:13
    So, no, I would not join ICNA, because I have seen it become hypocritical by the day. A decade ago, it was a decent organization, but now, no one can even recognize it. It is filled with the slavish who need almost a servile need to pay obeisance at every opportunity to Western culture. Their conventions are little more than a glorified match-making ground for couples. And now, they disrespect our long-respected holiday. Foolish? Indeed

    Reply
  27. Sammers

    To rejoice on eid is the right thing to do.
    To revel on 911 would be the wrong thing to do. Besides, revelry in islam is out of character.
    To behave differently because someone is watching is the worst thing muslims can do. Regardless of the reason.
    Seems to be a ‘loss in translation’ of thier intent by ICNA. Perhaps ICNA can recognize and correct.

    Reply
  28. Suzanne

    Where is the outrage, people? So much evil is being done in the name if Islam. Our religion is being hijacked. 9/11 represents the worst misinterpretation of Islam imaginable. If you agree, then we have to act in ways in the US that separate us from the terrorists. That is our job in performing Dawah. Dawah on Eid is a very good thing. Pray, enjoy your family…but public amusement-park festivals on 9/11?? Are you nuts? Just b/c your kids want to go to an amusement park doesn’t mean you have to go. This is a teachable moment…besides they’ll get much more out of quality time with parents who care, then riding rides all day long.

    Reply
  29. Asif

    I have a question:
    do you think Americans will be absent from Six Flags on 9/11 ?
    Will all Americans be commiserating on 9/11 or will most of them get on with their lives ?
    Muslims need not feel guilty on anything. Nor does every Muslim need to give dawah on 9/11.

    Reply
  30. Husain

    Suzanne, if so much evil is being done in the name of Islam, then perhaps there is something wrong with the religion itself? Why are you even a Muslim?

    Reply
  31. R

    I am afraid that Eid, no matter what day it falls on, will be cast as a celebration of 9/11 by those who are campaining fervously against Islam and Muslims in general.

    Reply
  32. Radouane

    Good questions Br. Asif.
    Let the islamophobs answered them. If six the rest of people enjoy the six flags on 9/11 why not us. Please lets not fell on the islamophobs trap and I would say IGNORE them period. There is no end for their accusations…

    Reply
  33. Ansar

    Hey Muslims. Stop being apologetic for anything a Muslim does. We all should go and celebrate on the Eid day. Its Eid first then 9/11.
    9/11 was indeed a tragedy but does that stop non-muslims and other to go about their business for example; going to six flags etc, eating, working, going to the beach. Surely, it does not.
    That is the fundemental problem with us; we are still apologetic about 9/11 as if it was us who brought the buildings down.
    May their soul rest in peace, and so does ours.

    Reply
  34. robert

    Muslims should adhere to whatever religious observences are appropriate. 9/11 is not a national day of mourning and the vast majority of Americans will do whatever they normally do on that day.

    Reply
  35. Shariq

    We should not let ourselves fall into the “guilty by association” ring. Most Americans will go on and about their lives just like any other day, and a lot of them will surely be going to Bars/Strip Clubs (it being Saturday). Will the utterly nonsense Islamophobic media antics be out and about bashing the people who are found to be at places or doing something that is generally frowned upon or considered less moral. Is 9/11 a national mourning day ? I find the whole idea of “insensitivity” a pure lunacy.

    Reply
  36. muqarrab

    Asalaamoalaikom.
    I think that Muslims should be allowed to celebrate as they are pleased because it is EID day. Its funny how the media NEVER mentions how many Muslims lost their lives on 9/11. If you do a little research, you will notice so many american weddings, parties and celebrations taking place on 9/11 this year because 9/11 just happens to land on a Saturday. That does not mean that all those taking part in parties, celebrations, etc are doing so to disrespect the 9/11 victims.
    I think that we Muslims need to stop being apologetic for the 9/11 incident because, first of all, it was not ISLAM that gave the guidance to the perpetrators, but was rather their own individual ignorance.
    If you visit the local correctional facilities, there are MANY generalizations that can be made about non-muslims so lets not even go there.

    Reply
  37. Gene G Jr

    hello brothers sisters we as Muslims in my view didnt cause 9/11 also I think we should mourn the victims of 9/11 from what I heard there were Muslims that were killed or survived the mess why dont we find out who the Muslims that were killed or survived and honor them and also honor the Americans that were killed and survived if Eid were to have fallen on 9/11 my first thing would be to go to New York and Honor the Muslims and Americans that were killed the Eid Celebrations can wait till 9/12/10 like here in Delaware our local Mosque is waiting untill 9/12/10 to have our Eid celebration BC on 9/11 there were Muslims and Americans killed and we should honor them before we have an Eid celebration thats what our local Mosque is doing and I thank them for doing that have a great weekend all in the room pbuy also I am an american citizen thats converting to Islam thanks

    Reply
  38. Shakil

    From Islam view point there is no harm in celebrating Eid one day late. After all you are living in a non-muslim country. Muslims in US and Europe have celebrated Eid late to accomodate the Weekends in the past so there is nothing wrong in delaying the Eid one day. Please donot bring Islam in your personal prejudice.

    Reply
  39. Nabeel

    ICNA and ISNA is making the right decision. It is time for Muslims to be more involved in mainstream. I love Muslims being vocal against Muslim decisions. I rarely see any Muslim writing comments on Fox, CNN websites when wrong things are being said about Muslims. Go read any story that is related to Muslims and see the prejudice and sentiments some people have against Muslims.
    Why can’t all of you be united and follow what is being communicated by your organizations. If you dont like the leadership quit being a sissy on the sideline run for election for ICNA and ISNA.

    Reply

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